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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
dozens of u.s. military bases and strike israel within minutes. this coming from a general in iran's revolutionary guard. cons week, their military carrying out large-scale war games. they are testing a medium range missile on mockups of american bases. and while iranian military leaders claim they could hit american targets within about 1300 miles, the defense experts say iran's military is no match for the u.s. of course, iran and much of the west have been in a diplomatic standoff over that nation's nuclear program. the iranians claiming the program is for peaceful purposes but many around the world doubt it. and another threat, which we have heard before, iran now saying it will stop certain oil tankers in the strait of hormuz, which would effect the delivery of one fifth of the world's oil supply. the u.s. already moving military assets to that region to counter any potential attack. jennifer griffin live with the news in washington tonight. jennifer, how seriously is the pentagon taking this latest threat to hit our bases? >> well, they're mindful, harris. this is the third d
though it can typically go further, up to 1200 miles. the u.s. has been positioning patriot missile batteries across the region to protect their bases, harris. >> well, which western targets are most at risk at this point? >> well, there is the fifth fleet base in bahrain and united arab emirates and qatar. 30,000 u.s. troops in the gulf. the commander of revolutionary guards aerospace division said today quote, these bases are all in range of our missiles and the occupied lands. he was referring to israel are also good targets for us. western oil tankers are also targets, especially u.s. and european flag tankers making their way through the strait of hormuz. iran has threatened to target anyone oil elm bar go that began on july 1st. today we heard that kenya is canceling agreement to buy 4 million tons of crude a year 40 billion a day in light new sanctions, harris. >> harris: diplomatically along what they have said stick to the sanctions to keep them to work. one agency breaking saxes to iran. >> eu sanctions. and we're now learning that a wing of the u.n. that is responsible fo
to be joined by a major general will join us with an update from afghanistan, from on the ground there. here is "the washington post "report on the same story -- winston-salem, n.c., republican caller -- what do you think about american exceptionalism? caller: if you're asking the non-working group, this is a great country because they live off of food stamps, medicaid, free housing but if you ask a middle-class, working class people, it is a terrible country because all you are doing is paying taxes and supporting the ones who don't work. you don't have enough money to buy insurance. you make too much, they will get medicaid. don't have enough money to buy groceries but you make too much to get food stamps. if you ask rich people, it is a great country because they are blind to what the four and they are robbing the country and blind to the middle class not being able to make ends meet? host: how you feel? caller: i follow the middle class. i am struggling to pay insurance and than obama care comes out and i don't see how that will help. he makes himself look like he is helping the country
think he should have a plan before you come down. we will have the u.s. naval academy and at 7:00. you might want to come out a little early and get your spot and listen to the music and then get ready for the show. >> where is the best place to park? >> there are a lot of places around the inner harbor to park. today is a great day to try to look for reporting, but you might not get it. be prepared if you might have to go into a parking garage. >> thank you so much, we appreciate that. for more on the fourth of july celebration, just had to our website, >> independence day is being celebrated by americans overseas. members of the australian second cavalry regiment had hamburgers and hotdogs on tables that were decorated with stars and stripes. >> it is a very patriotic day for all americans. to do that here in australia and share something that means a lot to us, it is great that they included us. it meant a lot to us to have them host us. >> the u.s. and australian governments made an agreement in celebration of america's independence. mitt romney and the man he wants to
>> gretchen: we're back outside with the girl scouts who will perform another number for us in the after the show show. thanks for being here today. >> clayton: happy independence day, everyone. enjoy this day. >> peter: god bless america. >> gretchen: here is to america. see you tomorrow. overseas this morning. a u.s. apology ended a bitter seven-month standoff with pakistan. the company reopening a critical border route that is up price nato forces in afghanistan. islamabad blocked the supply route after a nato airstrike killed 24 pakistani soldiers. good morning once again. i'm martha maccallum. we're here in "america's newsroom". gregg: happy independence day. i'm gregg jarrett in for bill. an apology critics are calling too easy but the agreement could save the united states $100 million every month. secretary of state hillary clinton having a telephone conversation with pakistan's prime minister discussing the death that led both countries into that bitter debate. clinton saying quote, we are sorry for the losses suffered by the pakistani military. we are committed to
henneberg is live on the story for us in washington. molly, is the u.s. admitting that our military messed up with that airstrike? >> reporter: no, martha, to the contrary. it was a very carefully worded apology that did not take the blame for the airstrike. look at more what secretary of state hillary clinton said to her counterpart in pakistan. she said, quote, i offered our sincere condolences to the families of the pakistani soldiers who lost their lives. foreign minister carr and i talked about the mistakes that resulted in loss 6 pakistani military lives. we are sorry for the losses suffered by the pakistani military. the obama administration declined to apologize for the past seven months. u.s. military leaders did a investigation and found that pakistani forces fired at u.s. troops and helicopters first prompting the u.s. response that killed 24 pakistani troops. although pakistan did not get the quote, unconnal apology it had asked for today the land routes between pakistan and afghanistan will reopen. martha. martha: in the end of it what the united states got out of it, molly? >
what kristen was mentioning to us, the president kicking off his bus tour tomorrow. pawlenty and jindal will bracketing with him and rob portman as well, traveling to new hampshire this weekend. no word if he'll be meeting with romney. where do we stand in terms of the what's the messaging we're looking for going forward as the president goes out there and tries to make the message, put the message out there, that romney is a jobs expovertier? >> of course, the message that the obama campaign has been pushing hard from the very beginning is attacking mitt romney's record at bain capital. and as controversial as that tactic has been from both republicans and democrats, most notably corey booker and bill clinton, that's really the lane that the obama campaign is staying in. and they're sort of attacking bain capital from every angle they can find, their latest political attack ad against romney focused on bain capital investing in companies that ship jobs overseas. and that's -- i think it's a strategy that's really been working for the obama campaign. he's been able to paint romney as so
and let them use it to increase the voice of private schools, strip you of your voice because he doesn't think that you all know much about how to educate, and he characterizes you and his allies characterize you as not caring about -- not caring about the students, but about yourself. my jill is little when she says that teaching is not what she does. it's who she is. [applause] these guys don't get that. i don't think they don't understand why you chose to teach in the first place. [applause] i honest to god don't think they understand. and by the way, like in politics, in business, religious hierarchy, there is really good teachers and there is really lousy teachers. there is a really lousy teachers and some plain good teachers. we are no different than any other profession in the world. but we are a profession. [applause] we are a profession! this is a calling. you chose to be teachers because you care. you choose to be teachers because you want to make this country better. you chose to be teachers because you know every child -- every child is entitled -- entitled to go as far as
. we begin with chief of interpretation at ft. mchenry in baltimore. he recently joined us to talk about the fort bombardment and the creation of the star spangled banner. this is about 30 minutes. you are looking at the arrival of tall ships at baltimore's fort mchenry. welcome to american history tv on cspan3 where we'll be live until 2:00 p.m. eastern today, taking your calls and talking with historians about this little-known war. we'll go live to ft. mchenry now, the home of the star spangled banner. we are joined by vince vaise. chief of interpretation at ft. mchenry thanks for joining us this morning. >> good morning. >> before we get into our conversation with you we want to invite our viewers by phone. it's easy to do that in the you're in the eastern or central time zone. that number is 202-737-0002. make sure you mute your television when you call in and we will get to your calls in a moment. when visitors come to mt. mchenry, what is the reason you tell them the war of 1812 is significant in american history? >> this is really the war that defined us as a people and rea
of the little never war of 1812. we begin with vincent vaise. he recently joined us to talk about "the star spangled banner." this is about 30 minutes. you are looking at the arrival of tall ships at baltimore's fort mchenry. welcome to american history tv on cspan3 where we'll be live today. we are joined by vince vaise. before we get into our conversation with you we want to invite our viewers by phone. the number -- make sure you mute your calls when you call in. >> this made the flag the symbol of the american people that it is today. yes, the american flag had already been invented, but it was really during the war of 1812 in which the american flag won international respect through the words of francis scott key and the successful defense of this fort during the war of 1812 from the british and also some of the great naval battles of the war of 1812, like the american ships, like "old ironsides," the "constitution." >> you are dressed in full battle or full formal regalia at ft. mchenry. why don't you tell us a bit about the uniform you're wearing and where exactly in the fort you're
be their biggest yes. this family is from the philippines, they planned their first trip to the u.s. around the holiday. >> really exciting. i don't know what to expect. >> reporter: they'll be back at the mall after a day of sight-seeing. >> i would like to see this event. i know it's spectacular. very exciting. >> reporter: tuesday night's rehearsal was cut short because of bad weather moving through. as in years past, the concert will be on the west lawn of the capitol. then the fireworks. >> my father-in-law was in the navy, he passed away. i'm trying to honor him. >> reporter: a slew of stars will take the concert stage from megan hilde of "smash" to "american idol" winner phillip phillips and math through broderick. this family will be spending their evening somewhere on the mall. >> not sure, depends on how crowded it is. >> reporter: getting around downtown tonight could be tough. between a lack of parking and multiple street closures, public transportation may be the way to go. something else to try? a new communication system put out by u.s. park police, it can send weather adviso
chart. that does it for us tonight. rachel will be back on thursday. don't forget, you can check out my work at or follow me on twitter at and on facebook, have a great fourth of july and >>> and happy fourth of july, 2012, everyone. this is msnbc, i'm richard lui. president obama is returning to the white house this morning to host a fourth of july barbecue for military families. he will also mark the holiday by speaking at a naturalization ceremony for military service members. joining us right now is nbc white house correspondent kristen welker. good morning to you. >> good morning to you. busy day here at the white house. >> the day kicks off with a naturalization ceremony. >> yes, 25 members of the military will be sworn in as u.s. citizens here at the white house. president obama will speak at that event. secretary of homeland security, janet napolitano will be a part of that event. a big day here. it's the first time they're going to hold a naturalization ceremony at the white house on independence day. this is the
gretchen carlson is here to help us out. she's always so good at this. >> that's a set-up, heather and heather. it's a holiday! so my brain is on holiday. here we go! >> fireworks! >> two in a row. >> bombs away. >> happy fourth to you, gretchen. >> heather, likewise. hope you have some fun today. >> see you back here tomorrow. "fox & friends" starts right now. >> happy fourth of july, everyone! good morning, it is wednesday, july 4, 2012, i'm gretchen carlson and you know what we can say today? happy birthday, america. let's celebrate. his vote made all the difference. chief justice john roberts upholding obamacare so why are we hearing reports he also wrote most of the dissent? he was busy. >> and this independence day, are dependents on government at an all time high? we're an entitlement nation, i'm afraid and some states getting rewarded for making sure we stay that way. >> sorry, folks. no fourth of july fireworks for one american town. they might upset the birds nesting. might be sleeping. we're not kidding. it will scare them and wake them up. "fox & friends" starts rig
>> that's the u.s. army guard fife and drum corps performing "yankee doodle dandy." it's one thing to be able to toot this holiday. they're able to toot those horns in wonderful fashion. >> yeah, no kidding. >> as a little kid, i had one of those hats and used to wear it all the time. i couldn't play something like this. that was fantastic. >> i feel like i'm time traveling, traveling back. >> with that tiffany's store over his shoulder. >> wonderful. mix of old and new today as we celebrate the fourth of july and america's birthday. thank you so much for tuning into "fox & friends" this morning. i'm flanked by clayton and peter johnson jr. today. good morning. >> good morning, thanks for having me. >> and we'd like to thank people today, right? >> we have some beautiful flowers on the set here at 1-800 flowers does a great job of setting up our set this morning and providing some color this morning. thank you so them. also this morning, we've got a veteran outside, a world war ii veteran who will pull a car with his teeth. >> can't wait to see that. >> do i need to say anythi
, but a little patient with us here, but they are moving as quickly as they can. you can see what they are up against here, just the physical nature having to remove things like this. this scene is repeating over and over in the states. >> brian, stay with us. things are changing by the hour. brian todd reporting live in west virginia. and also this morning we are asking leaders from right across the region, how are you going to fix this thing? when is the power coming back for people? first, the mayor of lewisburg, john manchester, is going to join us at 6:30 eastern time. >>> more on the heat wave and when we expect relief. alexandra is in for rob marciano, what a horrible situation. folks are without power and a couple of hot days forecasted for these states. >>> places like minneapolis, the heat index or what it will feel like, 112 degrees there. one thing you'll notice waking up on the east coast to go out to get your paper, there's more moisture in the area. the dew point is higher than it's been, so temperatures for some along the eastern seaboard may not be as hot, but the uncomfortab
telling us these trees down are a huge obstacle. we're right in the middle of a road here. you see the double yellow lines and this may not be cleared for a little while. that is impeding power crews as they try to move around. you mention food shortages, an official told me not too long ago this may be one of the worst food crises in a long time. they have two main pantries that distribute nonperishable food to the people in need, they are empty and starting a food drive trying to get food and water to people. water pressure is a huge issue. some of the pumps are fueled by electricity, they are done so water pressure is a big problem. people need to boil water. the national guard is getting out offering people help in getting water and boiling water and things like that. that is a logistical problem as well. how are people staying cool in this? we talked to residents in vf west virginia. any way they can at this point. >> it's very hot. i'm been setting on the porch since last night. >> it's pretty bad. the heat is the main thing, can't keep our apartment cool. i've never been wit
taking the reports and doing something about them. and not giving us a global fix, which doesn't do us any good. really telling us your block, your neighborhood, we expect to get to it by this date. >> reporter: for many, independence day is a day of chipping away at downed trees and waiting for the lights to come back on fr. for some with no power on, the old farm pool was a great relief from the heat. today they are welcoming members of the tildon woods pool which was damaged in the storm. >> in addition to not having power, they have wires across their parking lot. we opened up our pool to their memberships so they can come up here and join us today for july 4th and the rest of the week until they get their power back. >> reporter: some of the folks here in montgomery county say they expect their power to come back on by 11:00 p.m. friday night. in the latest release by pepco, they say their restoration efforts will stretch into the weekend. darcy spencer, news 4. >>> some d.c. neighborhoods look like the storms hit maybe yesterday. this is warren street in northwest. that road stil
before us. we just do. so i am very thankful to of the gibson and the other guys around that time, too, that were very good to me -- i am very thankful to althea gibson. we are all in this together, so we have to help each other. >> what do you think has been the biggest change in the last 20 years? >> that was not very long ago. i think it has been an evolution of equipment change. this is really like. -- light. this is like my security blanket. what i told my dad i wanted to play tennis, my dad said, "show me." i went to my neighbors and beg them to give me a job. when i had $8.29 sit up in a mason jar, i said i could not wait any longer and i went to brown's sporting goods and got my first racket. the salesperson said to me, "what kind do you want?" i asked what a dollars and 29 cents would buy. i got it because i loved the color. it was my favorite color. i would sleep with it every night and dream about winning and being number one. so when i see this, i love it. just like blindness, you know, with your blankie -- just like linus. the biggest thing is the materials in the rackets
the colleges come together with us and start working with these young people while they're still in high school. >> suarez: judy woodruff looks back at the major decisions in this high-impact supreme court term with historian michael beschloss and marcia coyle of the "national law journal." >> ifill: and on this most american of holidays, we turn to the men who signed the declaration of independence and what happened to them after they did. >> they were placed under house arrest. they had-- they were allowed to write letters home. they were visited by physicians. no one was ever tortured. that's something i have seen over the years and it is wrong. every time i see it, i shudder. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill:
's argument had "injured us more, and has been as great a barrier to our emancipation as any thing that has ever been advanced against us," for it had " sunk deep into the hearts of millions of the whites, and never will be removed this side of eternity." so, the ideal of equality jefferson proclaimed, he also betrayed. he got it right when he wrote about "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." as the core of our human aspirations. but he lived it wrong, denying to others the rights he claimed for himself. and that's how jefferson came to embody the oldest and longest war of all -- the war between the self and the truth, between what we know and how we live. so enjoy the fireworks and flags, the barbecues and bargain sales. but hold this thought as well -- that behind this fourth of july holiday are human beings who were as flawed and conflicted as they were inspired. if they were to look upon us today they most likely would think as they did then, how much remains to be done. with those contradictions of american history in mind, this seemed a good time to talk with khalil gibran muh
in the first price. but you know what? mcconnell explains that whole thing to us, too. in january 2011, he gave an interview to the atlantic in which he said we worked very hard to keep our fingerprints off these proposals because we thought that the only way the american people would know a great debate was going on was if the measures were not bipartisan. you know what? mcconnell was correct. i think that's one of the most profound things anyone has said about politics. what he understood is what makes a bill bipartisan is not the ideas in it or the spirit in which it is offered. it's whether any legislatures from the other party sign on. if they do, by definition, the bill is partisan. so by keeping his members off thedemocrats' major bills, he made each and every one of those pieces of legislation into a partisan bill and destroyed the president's hope for image as a bipartisan compromiser. this week on fox news, mcconnell gave another remarkably honest interview. they have been saying repeal and replace, repeal and replace, but they haven't come together behind anything that would replace
the employment of free will less useful and more rare, it confines the action of the will in the smart space and little by little steals the very use of it from the citizen. equality has prepared men for all these things and has exposed them and to regard them as a benefit and i think here tocqueville is providing 80 or 100 years, 80 years before the progressive movement and 100 years before the new deal. it is not simply that they are economically harmful, that they tend to deter the economic activity, prosperity and economic growth. it is their effect on the character of people, the effect that the superintendent government that tends to try to protect you from all damage and provide them perfect security. one that's run by a centralized, bureaucratic apparatus and run by alleged experts, justified by the supposed inability of ordinary people to take care of themselves and navigate the shores and reefs of the advanced, industrial democracy. this soft despotism tends to destroy human character. this despotism that assumes that people are incompetent children in treating them like that tends
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)